3 of the Best: This Week’s Top Articles, Vol. 15

These pieces have caught your attention throughout the week. So here they are in one place for you to consume, digest, and enjoy.

Welcome to our brand new weekend roundup, Three of the Best! Every Sunday, we’ll post up Breaking Muscle’s top three articles of the week. These pieces have caught your attention throughout the last seven days. So here they are in one place for you to consume, digest, and enjoy.

 

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from Blogger http://corneliussteinbeck.blogspot.com/2016/01/3-of-best-this-weeks-top-articles-vol-15.html

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The Myth of More Is Better

Society’s obsession with work ethic is destroying the efficacy of your training.
Look around, and you will find yourself surrounded by people telling you “More Is Better.” This line of thought is also prevalent in the minds of athletes as they approach training. Unfortunately, it has led to an epidemic of Tommy John (UCL surgery) in baseball and a culture that thinks Insanity and CrossFit’s get-them-tired approach to training is the point of every workout. 
 

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from Blogger http://corneliussteinbeck.blogspot.com/2016/01/the-myth-of-more-is-better_31.html

The Myth of More Is Better

Society’s obsession with work ethic is destroying the efficacy of your training.
Look around, and you will find yourself surrounded by people telling you “More Is Better.” This line of thought is also prevalent in the minds of athletes as they approach training. Unfortunately, it has led to an epidemic of Tommy John (UCL surgery) in baseball and a culture that thinks Insanity and CrossFit’s get-them-tired approach to training is the point of every workout. 
 

read more

from Blogger http://corneliussteinbeck.blogspot.com/2016/01/the-myth-of-more-is-better.html

Tuscan Pork with Chickpeas and Spinach

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Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 cup onion, chopped
  • 1 1/4 pounds pre-marinated* lemon-garlic pork fillet, cut into 1/2″ thick
  • 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (15-ounce) Italian-seasoned tomato sauce (without added sugar)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 20 ounces (approx. 2, 10-ounce bags) baby spinach leaves
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

*If you’d rather DIY,  mix 4 cloves minced garlic, 1 lemon zested and juiced, and 1/4 cup canola oil and marinate overnight.

Directions

  1. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 2 minutes, or until fragrant. Scrape the onion to the side.
  2. Add the pork. Cook for about 4 minutes, turning once, until browned on both sides.
  3. Add the chickpeas, tomato sauce, and salt. Stir. Adjust the heat so the sauce is at a moderate simmer. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  4. Add the spinach, a large handful at a time, covering the pan between each addition. Cook for about 3 minutes total, or until all the spinach wilts.
  5. Transfer the pork to plates.
  6. Add the lemon juice to the pan. Stir to combine. Spoon over the pork.

Source: Tuscan Pork with Chickpeas and Spinach – MyFitnessPal 

Image Credit: Tuscan Pork with Chickpeas and Spinach

The post Tuscan Pork with Chickpeas and Spinach appeared first on NUTRITIONCLUB.

from The Nutrition Club http://thenutritionclub.blogspot.com/2016/01/tuscan-pork-with-chickpeas-and-spinach.html

from Blogger http://corneliussteinbeck.blogspot.com/2016/01/tuscan-pork-with-chickpeas-and-spinach.html

The Single Dumbbell Workout Plan

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When you walk into a gym that seems overly crowded and filled with terrible equipment, you should head straight for the dumbbell rack. You can begin a single dumbbell workout plan that will strengthen your entire body without you having to stand in long lines to use old equipment. Here are four exercises that must be added to your workout plan.

Focus on heavy lifting during this workout. If you are a regular lifter, you should begin with a weight of about 45 pounds. Those who are just getting back to the gym after a hiatus should stay in the 20-30 pound range. You may notice that there aren’t any supersets, but this because they are unnecessary when you are doing movements that are complex and demanding on the metabolism. You should rest for no more than a minute and a half between sets and two minutes between your exercises. You should aim for a 45 minute session that leaves your body sore and covered in sweat.

One-Arm Dumbbell Snatch

This is a great exercise to add to your single dumbbell workout plan. It works on the majority of your pulling muscles while improving your coordination and timing. Begin with your feet shoulder-width apart and squat enough for the dumbbell to rest between your legs near your shins. Make sure that your back remains flat and avoid using your opposite arm for support. Next, thrust your hips forward while slightly jumping upward and allow the momentum to move the dumbbell to a place that is level with your eyes. Pull the weight up rather aggressively until your arm locks out overhead. This should all occur with one motion. Hold the weight close to your body without allowing it to swing outward. You should do four sets with eight repetitions for each arm.

Goblet Squat

Dumbbells are not as wielding as loaded barbells, so the goblet squat uses far more muscles than the back and barbell front squats. In order to stay upright, you will need to fire stable, small muscles. The front load will allow your torso to remain in a a vertical position, which means that you will have an improved alignment and more depth. Doing goblet squats with the right techniques can be rather difficult, but it will allow you to increase to the level of mobility needed for solid front and back squats. In order to do it, sand with your feet positioned a bit wider than your shoulders and hold the dumbbell to your chest. Push your hips back and make sure to keep your chest up, then squat until your elbows touch the inner part of the knees. Complete five sets of 15 reps.

Single Arm Plank And Dumbbell Row

One of the main functions of the abdominal muscles is to help keep your torso stable against any outside forces (like when someone runs into you when you are walking down the street). The perfect solution to this is doing anti-rotational planking. On a bench or some other knee-level surface, plank with your arms resting on the bench, feet firmly planted together on the floor, arms straight and a dumbbell in one of your hands. Move the hand that contains the weight from the bench so it hangs down on the side. Engage your abdominal muscles and plank as if both hands remain on the bench. Keep your hips level without twisting them, row the weight up to the torso and squeeze the shoulders together at the top. Lower the weight down very slowly and repeat . Complete four sets of 12 repetitions for each arm.

Turkish Get-Up

This is the last move of the single dumbbell workout plan. It will help strengthen your core. back, legs. shoulders and chest – basically, everything – and it will help condition your metabolism, increasing your heart rate quickly when you stand straight up with the weight then lower it back to the floor. If you do several of these in a row, it can be as tiresome as sprinting.

Lie on your back with the dumbbell in your hand held up over your right shoulder. Bend the right knee and keep your right foot flat. Move your left arm into a 45-degree angle and shift all your weight to the left side of your body. Press the left palm on the floor, raise your hips and move your left foot backward until you are kneeling on the left knee. Keep the right arm in a steady position and stable to the shoulder. Keep your eyes on the dumbbell for the duration. At this point, shift your weight on the right side and stand with the dumbbell remaining above your head. Now do each step in reverse while holding the dumbbell stable with your arm locked above you until you are positioned on your back again. Complete three repetitions on each side for a minute and a half each.

The post The Single Dumbbell Workout Plan appeared first on NUTRITIONCLUB.

from The Nutrition Club http://thenutritionclub.blogspot.com/2016/01/the-single-dumbbell-workout-plan.html

from Blogger http://corneliussteinbeck.blogspot.com/2016/01/the-single-dumbbell-workout-plan.html

Crispy Baked Kale Chips

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Ingredients

  • 1 (6-ounce) bunch curly green kale
  • 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon onion powder
  • Salt to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 300°F.
  2. Remove stems from the kale leaves and chop into 1-inch to 2-inch pieces. Spin kale in a salad spinner to remove excess moisture or pat dry with paper towels. Transfer kale leaves to a large bowl.
  3. Toss with olive oil, garlic powder, paprika, onion powder, and salt. Using your hands, gently massage oil into leaves.
  4. Spread kale leaves in a single layer onto a baking sheet or two. (Make sure leaves don’t overlap.)
  5. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until kale leaves have darkened and dried. Let sit on the stovetop for 5 minutes to cool before serving.
  6. Store extra chips in an airtight container.

Source: Crispy Baked Kale Chips – MyFitnessPal

Image Credit: Crispy Baked Kale Chips 

The post Crispy Baked Kale Chips appeared first on NUTRITIONCLUB.

from The Nutrition Club http://thenutritionclub.blogspot.com/2016/01/crispy-baked-kale-chips.html

from Blogger http://corneliussteinbeck.blogspot.com/2016/01/crispy-baked-kale-chips.html

Surprising Diet Advice: Why Science Justifies Eating Fried Food

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Surprising new research indicates why science justifies eating fried food. When vegetables are either fried or sautéed in EVOO (extra virgin olive oil), cancer-fighting compounds are strengthened.

Vegetables in general are good for your body. However, by frying them with EVOO, you improve them in two important ways. First, you give them a boost in taste. Second, you make them even healthier for you.

That may not sound right, but you did see the line correctly. You need to FRY the vegetables. The University of Granada just put out a study that indicates that cooking vegetables in this way has a number of benefits. The food can help you stave off cancer. It can help you age well and even keep you from developing macular degeneration and diabetes.

Whenever you cook a vegetable, you decrease the amount of nutrients it has. This is because when a vegetable is boiled, vitamins are released into the water. As a result, frying was thought to be harsh on food as well. However, this latest study shows that might not be the case.

Researchers worked with eggplant, tomato, pumpkin and potato to determine why science justifies eating fried food. They removed both the skin and the seeds, and they cooked the vegetables in several different ways. They were boiled in water, boiled in water and extra virgin olive oil, fried in EVOO and sautéed in EVOO.

After the vegetables were done, researchers looked at several aspects of the food. They examined the moisture content, number of phenols, dry matter, antioxidant capacity and fat. Vegetables that were fried in extra virgin olive oil had more fat, less moisture and had higher antioxidant and phenol levels. These same results were not found among the other methods of cooking.

As a result, the researchers determined that using oil to transfer the heat led to higher levels of phenolic compounds in vegetables. This means that the vegetables are even better for you, although they do have more calories as a result of the cooking process. Boiling did not have this same effect, because the heat transfer took place in the water.

It is important to remember that fat is not the enemy. Keep an eye on the amount of oil that you are eating, however; you do not want to go overboard.

The post Surprising Diet Advice: Why Science Justifies Eating Fried Food appeared first on NUTRITIONCLUB.

from The Nutrition Club http://thenutritionclub.blogspot.com/2016/01/surprising-diet-advice-why-science.html

from Blogger http://corneliussteinbeck.blogspot.com/2016/01/surprising-diet-advice-why-science.html